Wildlife and Rural Crime

Humberside Police are committed to the policing of Wildlife and Rural Crime.

We have trained 60 Wildlife Crime Officers (WCOs) who, along with their normal duties, volunteer to investigate and provide advice in relation to wildlife offences.

WCOs are specially trained in investigating crimes against wildlife. They will either assist other police officers or take the lead role in the investigation of the more intricate cases, and can also provide advice to colleagues & members of the public.

WCOs are able to provide support and advice in relation to Wildlife & Rural Crime, and have a personal interest in this type of work.

The Force has now held three National Wildlife Crime courses over the past three years delivered by Craig Fellows.  Craig is an expert in the field and delivers the training across the UK.  With 60 officers having completed the course we have one of the highest numbers of staff trained, if not the highest in England and Wales.

Humberside Police is fast becoming one of the lead forces in the area of wildlife crime within the UK. Investing in staff in this complex area of policing is one of the main ways forward to protect our rural communities and wildlife. Having 60 staff trained, who are prepared to go that extra mile to protect our valuable wildlife for future generations, is a strong sign of our continued commitment to our rural communities.

News

Wildlife and Rural Officer Rich Fussey

July 2020 - ​We have a new dedicated Wildlife and Rural Crime Officer, Richard Fussey  covering  Hull and the East Riding of Yorkshire (follow him on twitter @HPWildlifeRural) -

Read about Rich [here]

Police Volunteer Sue Edmond with Chief Constable Lee Freeman

 

Police Volunteer Sue Edmund was awarded the Police Volunteer of the Year 2019 - Sue has worked tirelessly to help in our fight against rural crime

Read about Sue [Sue Edmund]

 

 

Humberside Police would like to ask residents, whether from the farming community or not, to keep their eyes open and report anything suspicious by calling the non-emergency number 101.  If someone sees a crime in progress always call 999.​

Read our new Rural Safety and Crime Prevention Guide here: